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Dear KC June 2019

Dear KC: June
A knitting advice column from the talented team of creators at KnitChats.com.


So this is month two of our "ask an expert" segment on the *B*CH Blog. The fantastic team of creators over at KnitChats are back with even more helpful tips and tricks! Every second Tuesday of the month KnitChats experts are going to answer your knitting questions. You can send in a specific pattern question or a more general knitting question. Chances are someone else wants to know the same thing that has been driving you crazy about your WIP. Just fill out this form to have your questions featured in an upcoming post. We can't wait to hear from you!
“I am a knitting fool. It's a quiet pastime, and a productive one. It enables one to join in the conversation or switch one's brain off, according to the interest or the excruciating dullness of what is being discussed.” ― Elizabeth Zimmermann
Dear KC,
When the pattern tells me that there is a 2.5 ease, does it mean that the 2.5 is included in the 34.5? Or should I look at it as 34.5 plus 2.5 ease? I measure 44 and can’t decide if I should cast for the 44.25 or the next size 47.
From the pattern:
To fit actual chest circumference 31–33 (34–36, 37–39, 40–42, 43–45, 47–49) inches, with approximately 2–4 inches of ease
Finished Chest Circumference:34½ (37¾, 41, 44¼, 47¼, 50½) inches -Shiva from California

Shiva,
You should go by the "finished chest circumference" which includes the 2-4" of ease. If you measure 44", then yes, you should knit the 47". If you're knitting exactly to the pattern's gauge, then you'll have about 3" of ease in your tank top. -KC
“I pick up my knitting and wind the yarn around my fingers so I can finish the row. The needles whisper softly as they slide against each other, as if telling secrets.” ― Lynn Austin

Dear KC,
I have been reading and reading this pattern and just can’t get it. I’m knitting a baby jacket and doing the back. Shape Raglan armholes:
Cast off 3 stitches at beg of next 2 rows 36(42.46.52.56) sets Dec 1 st at each end of next and 8(7.8.7.8) following 4th rows 18(20.22.24.26) sets. I don’t understand what 8 following 4th rows means, doesn’t make sense to me. I am doing the first size. -Janet
Janet,
That is confusing! Let's try approaching it this way. Basically, the decreases start with 36 sts and you end with 18 sts. Simply working some math, I think it may be you're doing 1 decrease at each end, 8 times, every 4th row, ending with 18 sts by my calculation. It may help if there's a schematic showing measurements of the raglan armholes to make sure the rate of decreasing matches up.
So here's how I'd break it down row by row:
Cast off 3 sts at beg of next 2 rows (36 sts)
Next row: Dec 1 st each end (34 sts)
*Next 3 rows: Knit even
**4th row: Dec 1 st each end (32 sts)
Repeat * and ** for a total 8 times and you should have 18 sts -KC

“SABLE- A common knitting acronym that stands for Stash Acquisition Beyond Life Expectancy.” ― Stephanie Pearl-McPhee

Dear KC,
Desperately need pattern help for Diagonal Rib baby blanket. I just don't know how to read some of the Rep from. Here's Row 1:
K4. *(P2. K2) 5 TIMES. **K3. (K2. P2) 5 TIMES. K3. REP FROM * TWICE MORE, THEN FROM *TO** ONCE. K4.
I've done Reps many times but not with *to**. If you could spell it out for me I would greatly appreciate it! -Beverly
Beverly,
I found your pattern on Ravelry and took a good look at the finished blanket to help figure out these repeats. Boy, this one really made me think!
Here's my breakdown:
Row 1:
K4. *(P2, K2) 5 times. **K3. (K2, P2) 5 times. K3. (50 sts)
*(P2, K2) 5 times. **K3. (K2, P2) 5 times. K3. [Rep from * twice more] (92 sts)
*(P2, K2) 5 times. K4. [Then from * to ** once] (24 sts)
Total 166 sts -KC
Hope this helps! Let me know how it goes. Good luck!
Sincerely,
KnitChats Team
Thank you KnitChats for all of your awesome advice! Let me know if you enjoyed this new series in the comments section. Also, don't forget to add your questions to this form for your chance to be featured in the next blog post.
You can follow along on my Instagram account @bobbleclubhouse for your daily dose of all things knitted and to stay up to date on our upcoming NYC events. Until next week, happy crafting!

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