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Dear KC: July

Dear KC: July
A knitting advice column from the talented team of creators at KnitChats.com.







Dear KC,
I'm knitting in the round and my beginning marker fell out. How do I figure out what is my beginning stitch?
-Patricia

Patricia,
This happens to all of us! Are you able to "read" your knitting? If so, start from where you are right now. Read your stitches one by one, going back and matching it to your pattern. You should be able to identify where to re-insert your beginning of round marker by doing this. If your stitches are all correct and you've remained on pattern, simply put a locking stitch marker on the yarn, specifically between the two stitches marking the first and last stitch of the round. You can either put a regular stitch marker back on the needle when you come around again or use the locking one placed right on your knitting. It stays put and you'd just keep moving it up every few rows.

Happy knitting!
-KC


“As I get older, I just prefer to knit”
-Tracey Ullman


Dear KC, 
I am following a pattern to make baby booties. It says begin heel: needle 1: knit 7,p1, k7 Heel pattern: Row 1:*sl1, k1 repeat across from * Row 2: purl across. My question is why is there a begin heel in the pattern because then I'm knitting /purling on the wrong sides. Or did I misunderstand what that row is? Thanks!
-Hannah

Hannah,
Without seeing your pattern, and assuming you're using double point needles, the "begin heel" on needle 1 is perhaps a setup instruction before actually starting your heel flap. The "heel pattern" is a repeat of Rows 1 & 2, worked back and forth on 1 DPN to create the heel flap.

I hope this is helpful!
-KC

“The twitch above my right eye will disappear with knitting practice”
-Stephanie Pearl-McPhee


Dear KC,
I have been reading and reading this pattern and just can’t get it. I’m knitting a baby jacket and doing the back. Shape Raglan armholes: Cast off 3 stitches at beg of next 2 rows 36(42.46.52.56) sets Dec 1 st at each end of next and 8(7.8.7.8) following 4th rows 18(20.22.24.26) sts I don’t understand what 8 following 4th rows means, doesn’t make sense to me. I am doing the first size.
-Janet


Janet, 
That is confusing! Let's try approaching it this way. Basically, the decreases start with 36 sts and you end with 18 sts. Simply working some math, I think it may be you're doing 1 decrease at each end, 8 times, every 4th row, ending with 18 sts by my calculation. It may help if there's a schematic showing measurements of the raglan armholes to make sure the rate of decreasing matches up.

So here's how I'd break it down row by row:
Cast off 3 sts at beg of next 2 rows (36 sts)
Next row: Dec 1 st each end (34 sts)
*Next 3 rows: Knit even
**4th row:  Dec 1 st each end (32 sts)
Repeat * and ** for a total 8 times and you should have 18 sts
-KC

Hope this helps! Let me know how it goes. Good luck!
Sincerely,
KnitChats Team
Thank you KnitChats for all of your awesome advice! Let me know if you enjoyed this month's questions in the comments section. Also, don't forget to add your questions to this form for your chance to be featured in the next blog post.

You can follow along on my Instagram account @bobbleclubhouse for your daily dose of all things knitted and to stay up to date on our upcoming NYC events. Until next week, happy crafting!

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